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Witnessing Drug Problems or Domestic Violence Causes Greater Asthma Incidence

No home is perfect, but dysfunction in the home is now revealed to be especially dangerous for children at risk for asthma. A new study shows that children exposed to just one adverse childhood experience (ACE) had a 28 percent increased chance of developing asthma than those with no ACEs. The study, published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the scientific publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), used data from the National Survey of Children’s Health. The survey drew from interviews with parents of more than 92,000 children aged 0 to 17 years to explore the relationship between ACEs, such as witnessing domestic violence, and the development of asthma.  Read full article...


Marijuana: The Allergen You Never Knew Existed

Growing up, you may have been given reasons for not smoking marijuana. What you may not have heard is that marijuana, like other pollen-bearing plants, is an allergen which can cause allergic responses. A new article published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the scientific publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), summarizes research on the ways in which cannabis can act as an allergen. The article draws attention to allergic responses that may be unfamiliar to marijuana users. Included in the article is information on case reports regarding episodes of allergic reactions, hypersensitivity and even anaphylaxis(a severe allergic reaction) to cannabis in its various forms. Among other things, cannabis pollen or cannabis smoke exposure has resulted in symptoms of allergic rhinitis (hay fever) conjunctivitis and asthma. Allergic asthma triggered by seasonal and occupational exposure to cannabis has also been reported..”  Read full article...


It's a  War on Pollen during Spring Allergy Season

While many people eagerly anticipate spring to see the last of cold weather and snow drifts, others dread the sneezing, wheezing, itchy eyes and coughing spring allergies bring. They understand the arrival of pollen – whether counts are high or low - means the onset of their misery. But there are ways to prevail in the fight to breathe easy and remain relatively sneeze-free. “People focus on the highs and lows of pollen counts,” said allergist James Sublett, MD, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). “What they don’t realize is that a high total pollen count doesn’t always mean you will have allergy symptoms. The pollen from the plant you are allergic to may not be high. The key is to know what you’re allergic to, and how to treat your particular symptoms.” More people than ever suffer from allergies of all kinds. Allergies are the 6th leading cause of chronic illness in the U.S. with an annual cost in excess of $18 billion. One in five Americans suffer from allergies each year. And though spring can bring lots of sneezing and sniffles, it’s important to remember that there are tools at your disposal – whether your suffering is mild or severe.   Read full article...


If You Are Having A Severe Allergic Reaction, You Need Epinephrine First and Fast 

If you are one of the millions of Americans who experiences a severe allergic reaction to food, latex or an insect sting, you should know the first line of defense in combating the reaction is epinephrine. Unfortunately, not all medical personnel know how important epinephrine is in bringing an allergic reaction under control. According to new guidelines published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the scientific publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), the fast administration of epinephrine is essential to the treatment of a severe allergic reaction.   Read full article...  


Moms of Food Allergic Kids Need Dietician's Support 

Discovering your child has a severe food allergy can be a terrible shock. Even more stressful can be determining what foods your child can and cannot eat, and constructing a new diet which might eliminate entire categories of foods. According to a new study published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the scientific publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), providing parents with detailed, individual advice from a dietician is a key component of effective food allergy care. “We know getting a food allergy diagnosis can be confusing and scary,” said dietician Carina Venter, PhD, lead author of the study. “We set out to explore what information and support mothers of kids with food allergies require and value from a dietary consultation. What we found is mothers want dieticians to help them ensure their child will be safe, and guide them through the process of creating a nutritionally complete diet. They also want to maintain normality for their child and promote independence.” Read full article...